Archive for the ‘Problems’ Category

postheadericon Eliminating mole crickets – information on killing mole crickets

Eliminating mole crickets – information on killing mole crickets

Image by Radu Privantu By Nikki Phipps (Author of The Bulb-o-licious Garden) Left untreated, mole crickets can become destructive to the lawn. To prevent damage from occurring or getting out of hand, mole cricket elimination, or killing mole crickets, is often the only recourse. Identifying Mole Crickets These insects can be recognized by their gray-brown, velvety bodies and wide spade-like front legs, which are well adapted for digging. Adult mole crickets are about an inch to inch and a quarter in length with wings. The nymphs, or immature mole crickets,…

postheadericon Webworm treatment: tips for controlling webworms

Webworm treatment: tips for controlling webworms

Image by Tim By Amy Grant Many people wonder what to do about webworms. When controlling fall webworms, it’s useful to analyze what exactly they are. Webworms, or Hyphantria cunea, usually appear on trees in the fall (while tent worms appear in spring), causing unsightly nests and severe leaf damage. Let’s learn more about fall webworm control. Fall Webworm Info Webworms are caterpillars that weave loose webbing around the tree’s foliage whilst munching on leaves, resulting in plant stress and leaf loss. This larval “nest” may cover single leaves or leaf…

postheadericon Tortoise beetle control: learn how to get rid of tortoise beetles

Tortoise beetle control: learn how to get rid of tortoise beetles

Image by Henrik_L By Mary H. Dyer, Master Naturalist and Master Gardener Tortoise beetles are small, oval, turtle-shaped beetles that survive by chewing their way through the foliage of various plants. Fortunately, the pests usually aren’t present in large enough numbers to do serious damage, but they may chew unsightly holes throughout plant leaves. Read on for more information and tips for tortoise beetle control. Tortoise Beetle Facts Measuring only about l/4 inch, adult tortoise beetles are odd little bugs with several interesting adaptations that keep them safe from predators….

postheadericon Blossom midge in plants: how to control midge pests in flower buds

Blossom midge in plants: how to control midge pests in flower buds

By Jackie Carroll Midges are tiny flies that have a big impact on your garden plants. They are destructive insects that can prevent flowers from blooming and form unsightly knots on plant stems and leaves. Read on for information on blossom midge control. What is Blossom Midge? There are over 100 species of midge (Contarinia spp.). Each species attacks a different type of plant or a small group of closely related plants. Some of the flowers affected by blossom or gall midge insects include: Advertisement Daylilies Orchids Plumeria Violets Jasmine…

postheadericon Cicada wasps in the garden: tips for controlling cicada killer wasps

Cicada wasps in the garden: tips for controlling cicada killer wasps

Image by John B By Kristi Waterworth Their sinister buzzing and ?-inch long stingers are enough to make most gardeners turn and run from the 1 ? to 2-inch long cicada wasp hunters, commonly known as the cicada killer wasp (Sphecius speciosus). Although they may give you a scare, cicada killer wasps are actually beneficial garden insects, only inflicting painful stings as a last resort. So exactly what are cicada killers wasps? Keep reading to learn more. What are Cicada Killer Wasps? Cicada killer wasps are a group of solitary…

postheadericon What are armyworms: information on armyworm control

What are armyworms: information on armyworm control

Image by Alton N. Sparks, Jr., University of Georgia, Bugwood.org By Kristi Waterworth Attracting moths and butterflies to the garden seems like a good idea, until those adults decide to lay their eggs where they’ve been merrily flying around, pollinating flowers. In about 10 days, caterpillar pests, like armyworms, appear out of nowhere, dead set on eating your garden to the last green nub. Armyworms in gardens are no fun, but if you keep a close eye on the activity among the veggies, you’ll quickly have them under control. What…

postheadericon What are crane flies: information on crane flies and lawn damage

What are crane flies: information on crane flies and lawn damage

Image by crabchick By Kristi Waterworth If you spy what looks like a giant mosquito hanging around your garden or zipping about near the back porch light, don’t panic – it’s only a crane fly. Throughout the summer, adult crane flies emerge from pupation below ground to mate and lay their eggs. Though many are beneficial decomposers, crane flies and lawn damage also go hand in hand. What are Crane Flies? Crane flies belong to the order Diptera, and are distant relatives to flies and mosquitoes. Regardless of their less…

postheadericon Codling moth protection – tips for controlling codling moths

Codling moth protection – tips for controlling codling moths

Image by Donald Hobern By Bonnie L. Grant and Becca Badgett (Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden) Codling moths are common pests of apples and pears, but may also attack crabapples, walnuts, quince and some other fruits. These small unassuming moths are dangerous to commercial crops and can cause extensive fruit damage. Actually, it is the moth’s progeny, the larva, which cause the damage while feeding. Controlling codling moths is important to prevent the spread of the insects and widespread orchard damage. Fruit trees need to be treated…

postheadericon What are kissing bugs: learn about conenose insects and their control

What are kissing bugs: learn about conenose insects and their control

Image by Jose Pablo Orozco Marin By Jackie Carroll Kissing bugs feed like mosquitoes: by sucking blood from humans and warm-blooded animals. People don’t normally feel the bite, but the results can be devastating. Kissing bugs cause serious harm by spreading disease to humans and animals. They can also cause deadly allergic reactions. Let’s find out more about identifying and eliminating kissing bugs. What are Kissing Bugs? Kissing bugs (Triatoma spp.), also called conenose insects, are easy to recognize by the 12 orange spots around the edges of their bodies….

postheadericon Aphids tree disease – how to treat tree aphids and honeydew dripping

Aphids tree disease – how to treat tree aphids and honeydew dripping

Image by Dean Morley By Jackie Carroll When you see tree leaves dripping sap, the usual cause is tree aphids. These pesky insect pests can cause serious stress to your trees and lead to disease. Learn more about aphids on tree limbs and foliage and what you can do for tree aphid treatment. What are Tree Aphids? These tiny, soft-bodied, pear-shaped insects can be almost any color. Aphids on tree foliage and shoots feed by sucking fluid from the tree through a slender mouthpart called a proboscis. They feed in…