Archive for the ‘Ornamental gardens’ Category

postheadericon How to start gladiolus early indoors

How to start gladiolus early indoors

Image by ktylerconk By Heather Rhoades Gladiolus are a delightful addition to the summer garden, but many gardeners wish that they could get their gladiolus to bloom early so that they can enjoy the beauty longer. Little do most people know but you can actually start gladiolus indoors in pots early, just like you may do with your vegetable plants. Steps to Starting Gladiolus Early Indoors You can start your gladiolus corms indoors about fourweeks before your last frost date. Gladiolus can be started in either soil or water. Which…

postheadericon Information about snowdrops and when to plant snowdrop flower bulbs

Information about snowdrops and when to plant snowdrop flower bulbs

Image by Brian Fuller By Heather Rhoades Snowdrop flower bulbs (Galanthus) are grown in both cold winter regions and moderate winters, but keep in mind they truly dislike warm winters. So, if you live in Southern California, Florida or other hot climates, you will have to pass on having the snowdrop flower in your garden. Information about Snowdrops Bulbs Snowdrop flower bulbs are small bulbs that are often sold "in the green" or undried. They can very easily dry out, so they won’t be happy sitting around for weeks on…

postheadericon Tips for getting tulips to rebloom

Tips for getting tulips to rebloom

Image by Igor Klisov By Heather Rhoades Tulips are a finicky flower. While they are graceful and beautiful when they bloom, in many parts of the country, tulips may only last a year or two before they stop blooming. This can leave a gardener wondering, “Why do my tulips bloom for several years and then go away?” or “Will tulips come back the next year if I plant them?” Keep reading to learn about what causes non flowering tulips and steps you can take to get tulips to bloom every…

postheadericon Planting forced daffodils in the garden: moving daffodils after flowering

Planting forced daffodils in the garden: moving daffodils after flowering

Image by spreader76 By Anne Baley To a gardener, few things are as dreary as the long, icy month of February. One of the best ways to brighten your home during cold months is by forcing bright bulbs such as daffodils, so that they bloom in the dead of winter. Once the flowering ends and spring begins to arrive, transplanting container-grown daffodils will probably be your next thought. Planting forced daffodils in the garden is possible, but there are some special techniques and precautions you should be aware of first. Transplanting…

postheadericon Caring for viburnum flowering shrub

Caring for viburnum flowering shrub

Image by pizzodisevo,on/off By Nikki Phipps (Author of The Bulb-o-licious Garden) With interesting foliage, attractive and fragrant flowers, showy berries and numerous varieties to choose from, viburnum makes an exceptional addition to nearly any landscape. What is Viburnum? Viburnums are a group of large-flowering shrubs, with some varieties reaching up to 20 feet. There are both evergreen and deciduous viburnum shrubs. Many have either white or pink blooms in early spring. Also commonly referred to as cranberry bush, viburnums are often used as ornamental fixtures in the home landscape. They…

postheadericon Stopping volunteer trees – managing unwanted tree seedlings

Stopping volunteer trees – managing unwanted tree seedlings

Image by Daisy’s Little Cottage By Kathleen Mierzejewski Many of us are very familiar with how to eliminate the herbaceous weeds that grow in our gardens, but when it comes to unwanted tree seedlings, often called volunteer trees or weed trees, we may be at a loss as to how to get rid of them from our yards. Let’s look at what makes tree seedlings become weed trees and how you can stop them. What is a Weed Tree? In today’s environmentally conscious times, it may seem painful or wrong…

postheadericon Rose chafer facts: treating rose chafers on garden roses

Rose chafer facts: treating rose chafers on garden roses

Image by MattiaATH By Stan V. (Stan the Roseman) Griep Retired American Rose Society Certified Consulting Rosarian – Rocky Mountain District The rose chafer and the Japanese beetle are both true villains of the rose bed. Both appear to have the same habits and life cycles, going from eggs laid in the ground by the mature female beetles, hatching out to larvae/grubs in the ground and maturing to beetles that attack plants and blooms without mercy. Read on for more rose chafer facts and control info. What are Rose Chafers?…

postheadericon My daffodils are not flowering: why daffodils didn’t bloom

My daffodils are not flowering: why daffodils didn’t bloom

Image by Gardening Know How By Becca Badgett (Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden) Late in winter we expect the perky blooms of daffodils to open and assure us spring is on the way. Occasionally someone says, “My daffodils are not flowering” this year. This happens for various reasons. Poor blooms on daffodils may be due to mistreatment of foliage the previous year or because bulbs are too crowded and daffodils won’t bloom. Reasons Why Daffodils Won’t Bloom Removing or folding leaves – Removing the foliage too soon…

postheadericon What is daffodil bud blast: reasons why daffodil buds don’t open

What is daffodil bud blast: reasons why daffodil buds don’t open

Image by Gardening Know How By Anne Baley Daffodils are usually one of the most reliable and cheerful of the signals for spring. Their bright yellow cup-and-saucer blooms brighten up the yard and promise warmer weather to come. If your daffodil buds wither and turn brown without ever blooming, you’ve been a victim of bud blast. Weather, nutrition and the way you treat the plant all can cause bud blast in daffodils, but most conditions are ones you can remedy for next year. Learn what causes daffodil buds not to…

postheadericon Tips to grow crepe myrtles in containers

Tips to grow crepe myrtles in containers

Image by Jim Capaldi By Heather Rhoades The crepe myrtle tree is considered to be the pride of the South, with their gorgeous blooms and lovely shade, a Southern summer without seeing a crepe myrtle tree in bloom is like having a Southerner without a Southern drawl. It just doesn’t happen and wouldn’t be the South without it. Any gardener who has seen the beauty of crepe myrtles has probably wondered if they can grow one themselves. Unfortunately, only people who live in USDA zone 6 or higher can grow…