Archive for the ‘Gardening how to’ Category

postheadericon Plant division: how to divide plants

Plant division: how to divide plants

Image by Molly Thompson, with permission By Nikki Phipps (Author of The Bulb-o-licious Garden) Plant division involves digging up plants and dividing them into two or more sections. This is a common practice performed by gardeners in order to keep plants healthy and create additional stock. Let’s look at the how and when of dividing plants. Can I Split a Plant? Wondering about the answer to the question “Can I split a plant?” Since plant division involves splitting or dividing of the crown and root ball, its use should be…

postheadericon Row covers for garden plants – how to use floating row covers in the garden

Row covers for garden plants – how to use floating row covers in the garden

Image by Eunice By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener Using row covers for garden plants is a great way to protect your prized plants from damaging cold or pests. Some of the best row covers include the floating garden row covers, which are lightweight and easy to use. You can also create homemade row covers for garden plants. Let’s learn more about how to use floating row covers to protect your plants. What are Floating Row Covers for Gardens? The use of garden row covers has increased in the last decade…

postheadericon Garden zone info: the importance of regional gardening zones

Garden zone info: the importance of regional gardening zones

Image by ncdc.noaa.gov By Jan Richardson The Christmas lights are down and home improvement stores are stocking gardening supplies that tempt your eye. You can’t wait to get started on your spring garden. Already your mind is filled with visions of crisp vegetables and a kaleidoscope of bedding plants. You can almost smell the sweet perfume of roses. If you already have your garden planted in your mind, you should stop and back up a few steps before loading up your shopping cart. The first activity any serious gardener should…

postheadericon Centipedes and millipedes: tips on millipede and centipede treatment outdoors

Centipedes and millipedes: tips on millipede and centipede treatment outdoors

Image by jdelard By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener Millipedes and centipedes are two of the most popular insects to be confused with one another. Many people freak out upon seeing either millipedes or centipedes in gardens, not realizing that both can actually be helpful. Centipedes and Millipedes Millipedes are normally dark in color with two pairs of legs per each segment of the body while centipedes are flatter than millipedes and have a set of well-developed antennae on their head. Centipedes can also be a number of colors and have…

postheadericon What is a rain gauge: garden rain gauge info and types of rain gauges

What is a rain gauge: garden rain gauge info and types of rain gauges

Image by Bernt Rostad By Amy Grant Rain gauges are a great way to save water in the landscape. There are different kinds that can be used depending on your needs. Keep reading for additional information on exactly what is a rain gauge and how a rain gauge can be used in the home garden. What is a Rain Gauge? Rain gauges for home use are a fundamental tool in the home landscape. With a garden rain gauge, maintenance of garden irrigation can be managed and therefore, results in healthier…

postheadericon Common garden birds of prey: attracting birds of prey to gardens

Common garden birds of prey: attracting birds of prey to gardens

Image by ahisgett By Bonnie L. Grant Bird watching is a naturally fun hobby, allowing the hobbyist to view a variety of beautiful and unique animals. Most gardeners set out feeders to attract songbirds and migrating species to their garden. Birds of prey in the garden are not as common, but they may show up when their food source is so easily available. They can be valuable as control against the rodents that inevitably show up to scavenge dropped seed or patronize your vegetable and fruit plants too. Attracting birds…

postheadericon Cleaning up garden: how to prepare your garden for winter

Cleaning up garden: how to prepare your garden for winter

Image by secret agent X-9 By Bonnie L. Grant Fall garden cleanup can make spring gardening a treat instead of a chore. Garden clean up can also prevent pests, weed seeds and diseases from overwintering and causing problems when temperatures warm. Cleaning out the garden for winter also allows you to spend more time on the fun aspects of gardening in spring and provides a clean slate for perennials and vegetables to grow. Cleaning Out the Garden for Winter One of the key aspects of fall cleanup is the removal…

postheadericon Plant propagation: tips for propagating adventitious roots

Plant propagation: tips for propagating adventitious roots

Image by Ton Rulkens By Bonnie L. Grant Plants need roots to provide support, food and water, and as storage for resources. Plant roots are complex and are found in a variety of forms. Adventitious roots are among these various types of root forms, and may no doubt lead you to wonder: what does adventitious mean? Adventitious root growth forms off stems, bulbs, corms, rhizomes or tubers. They are not part of traditional root growth and provide a means for a plant to spread without relying on underground root systems….

postheadericon Hover fly information: plants that attract hover flies to the garden

Hover fly information: plants that attract hover flies to the garden

Image by Susan Ellis, Bugwood.org By Jackie Carroll Hover flies are true flies, but they look like small bees or wasps. They are the helicopters of the insect world, often seen hovering in the air, darting a short distance, and then hovering again. These beneficial insects are valuable tools in the fight against aphids, thrips, scale insects and caterpillars. What are Hover Flies? Hover flies (Allograpta oblique) go by several other names, including syrphid flies, flower flies and drone flies. Hover flies in gardens are a common sight throughout the…

postheadericon What is replant disease: advice for planting where other plants died

What is replant disease: advice for planting where other plants died

Image by jim_snydergrant By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener It is always sad when we lose a tree or a plant that we really loved. Perhaps it fell victim to an extreme weather event, pest or a mechanical accident. For whatever reason, you really miss your old plant and want to plant something new in its place. Planting where other plants died is possible but only if you take appropriate actions, especially when disease issues are involved – which may result in replant disease. Let’s learn more about avoiding replant disease….