Archive for the ‘Gardening how to’ Category

postheadericon Algae on seed soil surface: how to get rid of algae on seeding soil

Algae on seed soil surface: how to get rid of algae on seeding soil

Image by Gardening Know How By Bonnie L. Grant Starting your plants from seed is an economical method that can also allow you to get a jump start on the season. That being said, the little sprouts are very sensitive to changes in conditions such as moisture and humidity. Excesses can cause damping off – algae growth on seed starting mix and other fungal issues. Read on to learn the reasons for algae on seed soil surface and how to prevent it. Algae are plants but very simple rudimentary ones which lack…

postheadericon Plants for pollinators: learn about pollinator friendly plants

Plants for pollinators: learn about pollinator friendly plants

Image by Gardening Know How, via Nikki Phipps By Mary H. Dyer, Master Naturalist and Master Gardener, www.summitspringsgardenwriting.com What is a pollinator garden? In simple terms, a pollinator garden is one that attracts bees, butterflies, moths, hummingbirds or other beneficial creatures that transfer pollen from flower to flower, or in some cases, within flowers. Planting a pollinator garden is more important than you may realize, and even a small garden can make a huge difference as pollinators have suffered greatly from loss of habitat, misuse of chemicals and spread of…

postheadericon Cheesecloth fabric: tips for using cheesecloth in the garden

Cheesecloth fabric: tips for using cheesecloth in the garden

Image by robynmac By Mary H. Dyer, Master Naturalist and Master Gardener Occasionally, due to references in articles, we hear the question, “what is cheesecloth?” While many of us already know the answer to this, some people don’t. So what is it anyway and what does it have to do with gardening? Keep reading to learn more. What is Cheesecloth? This multi-purpose fabric is a type of lightweight cotton traditionally used by cheesemakers to protect cheese during the aging process, hence its name. Cheesecloth is handy in the kitchen because…

postheadericon United states flowers: list of american state flowers

United states flowers: list of american state flowers

Image by liveslow By Becca Badgett (Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden) Official state flowers exist for each state in the union and also for some U.S. territories, according to the U.S. state flower list published by the United States National Arboretum. In addition to United States flowers, each state has an official tree and some states have even added a wildflower to the list of their official state flowers. To learn more about the flower for your state or how to use state flowers to color garden…

postheadericon Honeybee swarms: how to control a honeybee swarm in garden

Honeybee swarms: how to control a honeybee swarm in garden

Image by Nancy McClure By Bonnie L. Grant When gardens are in full bloom, we get emails and letters that say, “I have a honeybee swarm, help!” Bees are a vital part of fruit and vegetable production and their pollinating activities help keep flowers blooming and fruiting throughout the season. A honeybee colony may contain 20,000 to 60,000 individuals. Most of these go about their work separately, but rarely, a honeybee swarm in garden settings may occur. Therefore, it is vital to know the steps to take on how to…

postheadericon Community seed banks: how to start a seed bank

Community seed banks: how to start a seed bank

Image by Floydine By Bonnie L. Grant The importance of preserving native and wild species of seeds has never been higher than in today’s world. Agricultural giants are expanding their proprietary varieties, which threaten to encompass original and heirloom species. Collecting and storing seed species provides a consistent source of plant populations that may be threatened by modified seed, loss of habitat and lack of diversity. It is an important step in protecting a healthy habitat. Plus, it is easy, takes little space and the seed can be stored season…

postheadericon Starting a straw bale garden: how to plant straw bale garden beds

Starting a straw bale garden: how to plant straw bale garden beds

Image by Kirsten Skiles By Becca Badgett (Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden) Growing plants in a straw bale garden is a type of container gardening, with the straw bale being a large, elevated container with good drainage. Growing plants in a straw bale garden can be further elevated by locating the bales in a raised bed. Starting a straw bale garden is an inexpensive and viable option to working up the soil in a regular garden. Learning how to plant straw bale garden beds, on the ground…

postheadericon Plants for pollinators: learn about pollinator friendly plants

Plants for pollinators: learn about pollinator friendly plants

Image by Gardening Know How, via Nikki Phipps By Mary H. Dyer, Master Naturalist and Master Gardener, www.summitspringsgardenwriting.com What is a pollinator garden? In simple terms, a pollinator garden is one that attracts bees, butterflies, moths, hummingbirds or other beneficial creatures that transfer pollen from flower to flower, or in some cases, within flowers. Planting a pollinator garden is more important than you may realize, and even a small garden can make a huge difference as pollinators have suffered greatly from loss of habitat, misuse of chemicals and spread of…

postheadericon Bent flower stems: how to repair crushed or bent stems on plants

Bent flower stems: how to repair crushed or bent stems on plants

Image by EwaPix By Teo Spengler If you’ve ever inspected your garden after the kids play there, you may find your favorite plants have been trampled or damaged. Don’t despair. It is possible to repair bent flower stems on plants with a few simple tools. Read on to learn about fixing plant stems and the tools you will need to do this. Bent Flower Stems It’s not always the children who damage plants. A dog’s romp through the garden can end badly for your plants – with bent flower stems….

postheadericon Creating squirrel friendly gardens: how to welcome squirrels in the garden

Creating squirrel friendly gardens: how to welcome squirrels in the garden

Image by Gardening Know How, via Nikki Phipps By Liz Baessler Squirrels get a bad rap. For many people, they’re a pest to be tricked, driven away, or eradicated. And they can wreak some havoc if they’re allowed to: they dig up bulbs in garden beds, steal seeds from bird feeders, and chew through electrical wiring in houses. But with some creative discouragement in some places and encouragement in others, squirrels can live harmoniously in your backyard, giving you lots of interesting wildlife activity to watch and a more natural,…