Archive for the ‘Gardening how to’ Category

postheadericon Frog friendly gardens: tips for attracting frogs to the garden

Frog friendly gardens: tips for attracting frogs to the garden

Image by SNappa2006 By Jackie Carroll Attracting frogs to the garden is a worthy goal that benefits both you and the frogs. The frogs benefit by having a habitat created just for them, and you will enjoy watching the frogs and listening to their songs. Frogs are great insect killers, too. Let’s learn more about how to invite frogs to gardens. A Responsible Frog Pond in the Garden It is illegal to release non-native frogs in many areas, and there is good reason for this. Non-native species can take over…

postheadericon Root stimulating hormone: how to use rooting hormones for plant cuttings

Root stimulating hormone: how to use rooting hormones for plant cuttings

Image by peganum By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener One way to create a new plant that is identical to the parent plant is to take a piece of the plant, known as a cutting, and grow another one. Popular ways to make new plants is from root cuttings, stem cutting and leaf cuttings—oftentimes using a root hormone. So what is rooting hormone? Keep reading to find out this answer as well as how to use rooting hormones. What is Rooting Hormone? When propagating plants using a stem cutting, it is…

postheadericon Sodium tolerance of plants – what are the effects of sodium in plants?

Sodium tolerance of plants – what are the effects of sodium in plants?

Image by Nuno Andre By Bonnie L. Grant Soil provides sodium in plants. There is a natural accumulation of sodium in soil from fertilizers, pesticides, run off from shallow salt-laden waters and the breakdown of minerals which release salt. Excess sodium in soil gets taken up by plant roots and can cause serious vitality problems in your garden. Let’s learn more about sodium in plants. What is Sodium? The first question you need answered is, what is sodium? Sodium is a mineral that is generally not needed in plants. A…

postheadericon Garden folly history: how to create a garden folly

Garden folly history: how to create a garden folly

Image by creativenaturemedia By Mary H. Dyer, Master Naturalist and Master Gardener What is a garden folly? In architectural terms, a folly is a decorative structure that serves no real purpose other than its visual effect. In the garden, a folly is created simply to amaze and delight. Garden Folly History Although follies are found around the world, they are most common in Great Britain. The first follies were expensive structures built on the estates of wealthy English landowners in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. The elaborate follies…

postheadericon Soil and calcium – how calcium affects plants

Soil and calcium – how calcium affects plants

Image by Itinerant Tightwad By Jackie Rhoades Is calcium required in garden soil? Isn’t that the stuff the builds strong teeth and bones? Yes, and it’s also essential for the ‘bones’ of your plants – the cell walls. Like people and animals, can plants suffer from calcium deficiency? Plant experts say yes. Good soil and calcium are linked. Just as we need fluids to carry nutrients through our body, so is water needed to carry calcium. Too little water equals a calcium deficiency plant. If water is sufficient and problems…

postheadericon Foliar feeding with calcium: how to make your own calcium fertilizer

Foliar feeding with calcium: how to make your own calcium fertilizer

Image by Arria Belli By Amy Grant Foliar feeding with calcium (the application of calcium rich fertilizer to the plants leaves) may make the difference between a bumper crop of tomatoes to fruit with blossom end rot, or gorgeous Granny Smith apples to bitter ones. Let’s learn more about making and using a calcium foliar spray on plants. Why Use Homemade Calcium Rich Foliar Spray? Calcium foliar spray lends necessary calcium to the plant, preventing leaf necrosis, short brown roots, fungal issues, weak stems and stunted growth (damping off). Making calcium…

postheadericon Iron for plants: why do plants need iron?

Iron for plants: why do plants need iron?

Image by fdecomite By Anne Baley Every living thing needs food for fuel to grow and survive, and plants are just like animals in this regard. Scientists have determined 16 different elements that are crucial to healthy plant life, and iron is a small but important item on that list. Let’s learn more about the function of iron in plants. What is Iron and its Function? The role of iron in plants is as basic as it can get: without iron a plant can’t produce chlorophyll, can’t get oxygen and…

postheadericon Fixing magnesium deficiency in plants: how magnesium affects plant growth

Fixing magnesium deficiency in plants: how magnesium affects plant growth

Image by fdecomite By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener Technically, magnesium is a metallic chemical element which is vital for human and plant life. Magnesium is one of thirteen mineral nutrients that come from soil and when dissolved in water, is absorbed through the plant’s roots. Sometimes there are not enough mineral nutrients in soil and it is necessary to fertilize in order to replenish these elements and provide additional magnesium for plants. How Do Plants Use Magnesium? Magnesium is the powerhouse behind photosynthesis in plants. Without magnesium, chlorophyll cannot capture…

postheadericon Adding worms to a compost pile – how to attract earthworms

Adding worms to a compost pile – how to attract earthworms

Image by Mizina By Bonnie L. Grant Earthworm activities and waste are beneficial to the garden. Attracting earthworms provides the organisms which will loosen soil and add important nutrients for better plant growth. Learn how to attract earthworms for the optimum plant health and porosity. The organic and natural gardener may wonder, “Where do I get earthworms for garden health?” Outdoor vermicomposting can produce some of these important creatures and scores more can be encouraged to make your garden their home with specific cultivation practices. Let’s learn more about adding…

postheadericon How to till a garden: tilling your soil

How to till a garden: tilling your soil

Image by Mark Levisay By Heather Rhoades These days, tilling dirt is a matter of personal choice. There are some people in the world of gardening who believe that you should be tilling your soil at least once, maybe twice a year. There are others who believe that tilling your soil at all can be harmful to your soil in the long term. For the purposes of this article, we are assuming that you wish to know how to till a garden on a yearly basis. When to Till a Garden…