Archive for the ‘Edible gardens’ Category

postheadericon What is sapodilla fruit: how to grow a sapodilla tree

What is sapodilla fruit: how to grow a sapodilla tree

Image by Narith5 By Amy Grant Like exotic fruits? Then why not consider growing a sapodilla tree (Manilkara zapota). As long as you care for sapodilla trees as suggested, you’ll find yourself benefitting from its healthy, tasty fruits in no time. Let’s learn more about how to grow a sapodilla tree. What is Sapodilla Fruit? The answer to, “What is sapodilla fruit?” is quite simply a delicious tropical fruit ranking amongst the likes of mango, banana and jackfruit. Sapodilla answers to quite a few monikers such as Chico, Chico sapote,…

postheadericon Pollination of pumpkin plants: how to hand pollinate pumpkins

Pollination of pumpkin plants: how to hand pollinate pumpkins

Image by khudoliy By Amy Grant So your pumpkin vine is glorious, large and healthy looking with deep green leaves and it’s even been flowering. There’s one problem. You see no sign of fruit. Do pumpkins self-pollinate? Or should you give the plant a hand and, if so, how to hand pollinate pumpkins? The following article contains information about the pollination of pumpkin plants and hand pollinating pumpkins. Pumpkin Plant Pollination Before you panic about the lack of fruit, let’s talk pumpkin plant pollination. First off, pumpkins, like other cucurbits,…

postheadericon Haskap berry info – how to grow honeyberries in the garden

Haskap berry info – how to grow honeyberries in the garden

Image by LianeM By Bonnie L. Grant Honeyberries are a treat that really shouldn’t be missed. What are honeyberries? This relatively new fruit has actually been cultivated in cooler regions by our ancestors. For centuries, farmers in Asia and Eastern Europe knew how to grow honeyberries. The plants are native to Russia and have remarkable cold tolerance, surviving temperatures of -55 degrees Fahrenheit (-48 C.). Also called haskap berry (from the Japanese name for the plant), honeyberries are early season producers and may be the first fruits harvested in spring….

postheadericon Growing carrots in containers – tips for grow carrots in containers

Growing carrots in containers – tips for grow carrots in containers

Image by ccharmon By Becca Badgett (Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden) Growing carrots in containers is an excellent project for early spring or fall, as carrots prefer cooler temperatures than vegetables of summer. Planting a crop of container carrots during these seasons can result in a worthwhile harvest. You may hear that container grown carrots or carrots grown in the ground are difficult. While carrots can be considered finicky under some growing conditions, once you learn how to container grow carrots, you’ll want to make them a regular…

postheadericon Common stem and pod borer pests in beans

Common stem and pod borer pests in beans

Image by Merle Shepard, Gerald R.Carner, and P.A.C Ooi, Bugwood.org By Amy Grant It’s that time of year when the garden is booming with fat beans ripe for the pickin’. But what’s this? Your lovely legumes seem to be afflicted with borer pests in the beans. This problem may evidence itself as holes in the pods from bean pod borers or generally weakened plants with caverns carved into the stems, resulting from other bean stem borers. Borer Pests in Beans Bean pod borers such as the lima bean vine borer,…

postheadericon Jalapeno skin cracking: what is corking on jalapeno peppers

Jalapeno skin cracking: what is corking on jalapeno peppers

Image by Wisely Woven By Amy Grant Unblemished home-grown produce is often hard to find, but some marring is not necessarily an indication that the fruit or veggie is not usable. Take jalapenos, for example. Some minor jalapeno skin cracking is a common sight on these peppers and is called jalapeno corking. What exactly is corking on jalapeno peppers and does it affect the quality in any way? What is Corking? Corking on jalapeno peppers appears as scaring or minor striations on the surface of the pepper skin. When you…

postheadericon Tips for growing cilantro

Tips for growing cilantro

Image by Kel and Val By Heather Rhoades Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) is used in a great many different dishes, particularly Mexican and Asian dishes, but despite the growing popularity for this dish in cooking, you don’t see cilantro growing in the home garden as much as you do other popular herbs. This may be due to the fact that many people think that growing cilantro is difficult. This is not the case at all. If you follow these few tips for growing cilantro, you will find that you will be…

postheadericon Celeriac growing – how & where does celeriac grow

Celeriac growing – how & where does celeriac grow

Image by Bluestem Farm By Amy Grant Looking to expand your root vegetable garden? A delightful, delicious root vegetable garnered from celeriac plants just might be the ticket. If you’re reading this from somewhere in North America, it’s very possible that you have never tried or seen celeriac root. So what is celeriac and where does celeriac grow? Read on to learn more. Where Does Celeriac Grow? The cultivation and harvesting of celeriac occurs primarily in Northern Europe and throughout the Mediterranean Region. Celeriac growing also occurs in North Africa,…

postheadericon Strawberry leafroller damage: protecting plants from leafroller insects

Strawberry leafroller damage: protecting plants from leafroller insects

Image by Danny Chapman By Jackie Carroll If you’ve noticed any unsightly looking leaves or caterpillars feeding on your strawberry plants, then it’s highly possible you have come across the strawberry leafroller. So what are strawberry leafrollers and how do you keep them at bay? Continue reading to learn more about leafroller control. What are Strawberry Leafrollers? Strawberry leafrollers are small caterpillars that feed on dead and rotting strawberry fruit and foliage. As they feed on the leaves, the caterpillars roll them up and tie them together with silk. Since they…

postheadericon Washing garden vegetables: how to clean fresh produce

Washing garden vegetables: how to clean fresh produce

Image by jdavis By Amy Grant While gross, an occasional slug or garden spider clinging to your produce won’t kill you, but even if you are practicing organic gardening and maintain proper sanitation of the home garden, bacteria, fungi and other microbes may adhere to your freshly picked produce. Fresh veggies and fruit from non-organic gardens may have trace amounts of chemicals – such as pesticides. All of these have the potential for making you and your family very sick, so cleaning harvested fruits and veggies is crucial prior to…