Archive for the ‘Composting’ Category

postheadericon Can you put dryer lint in compost piles: learn about composting lint from dryers

Can you put dryer lint in compost piles: learn about composting lint from dryers

Image by Ralph Aichinger By Anne Baley A compost pile gives your garden a constant supply of nutrients and soil conditioner while recycling garden, lawn and household waste. Each pile requires a large variety of materials, which are divided into two types: green and brown. Green materials add nitrogen to the mix, while brown adds carbon. Together, the two combine to decompose and turn into a rich, brown substance. A common question is, “Can you put dryer lint in compost piles?” Let’s find out. Can You Compost Dryer Lint? In…

postheadericon Can you compost nuts: information about nut shells in compost

Can you compost nuts: information about nut shells in compost

Image by jschroe By Anne Baley The key to creating a large and healthy compost pile is to add a diverse list of ingredients from your yard and home. While dried leaves and grass clippings may be the beginnings of most suburban compost piles, adding a variety of minor ingredients will give your compost trace elements that are good for your future gardens. One of the surprising ingredients you can use is nut shells in compost. Once you learn how to compost nut shells, you’ll have a reliable source of…

postheadericon Composting tea bags: can i put tea bags in the garden?

Composting tea bags: can i put tea bags in the garden?

Image by A Girl With Tea By Amy Grant Many of us enjoy coffee or tea on a daily basis and it is nice to know that our gardens may enjoy the “dregs” from these beverages as well. Let’s learn more about the benefits of using tea bags for plant growth. Can I Put Tea Bags in the Garden? So the question is, “Can I put tea bags in the garden?” The resounding answer is “yes” but with a few caveats. Moist tea leaves added to the compost bin increase…

postheadericon Using seaweed for compost: learn how to compost seaweed

Using seaweed for compost: learn how to compost seaweed

Image by bowenmurphy By Amy Grant Oceanside gardeners have an unexpected bounty just lying outside their door. Gardeners in the interior have to pay for this gardening gold. I’m talking about seaweed, long an ingredient in organic fertilizers. Composting seaweed for use as a home garden amendment is cheap and easy, and you can harness seaweed garden nutrients alone or as part of a mixed compost pile. Harvesting Seaweed Garden Nutrients Seaweed garden nutrients are relatively low in nitrogen and phosphorus but contain about 60 other trace elements, as well…

postheadericon Composting tomato plants: when to compost tomatoes

Composting tomato plants: when to compost tomatoes

Image by urbanfoodie33 By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener There has always been much discussion among gardeners and horticultural professionals as to the question, “Is it ok to compost tomatoes?” or, more specifically, spent tomato plants. Let’s take a look at a few arguments against composting tomato plants and a discussion on the best way to compost your tomato plants should you choose to do so. Is It Ok to Compost Tomatoes? Once the gardening season has ended, there can be a great number of old tomato plants left lingering. Many…

postheadericon Composting hay: learn how to compost hay bales

Composting hay: learn how to compost hay bales

Image by Doug Beckers By Anne Baley Using hay in compost piles has two distinct advantages. First, it gives you plenty of brown materials in the middle of the summer growing season, when most of the freely available ingredients are green. Also, composting with hay bales allows you to construct a completely green compost bin that eventually turns into compost itself. You can find hay for compost on farms that offer spoiled hay at the end of the year, or in garden centers offering autumn decorations. Let’s learn more about…

postheadericon Kitchen composting: how to compost food scraps from the kitchen

Kitchen composting: how to compost food scraps from the kitchen

Image by PhillDanze By Bonnie L. Grant I think by now the composting word has gotten out. The benefits far outweigh simple waste reduction. Compost increases the water retention and drainage of soil. It helps keep weeds down and adds nutrients to the garden. If you are new to composting, you may wonder how to compost food scraps. There are many ways to begin kitchen waste composting. Start saving scraps and let’s get started. Kitchen Composting Info It may seem odd at first to save old food and trimmings on…

postheadericon Composting pine needles: how to compost pine needles

Composting pine needles: how to compost pine needles

Image by Luis Leonardo By Jackie Carroll Abundant and free in most parts of the country, pine needles are a great source of organic matter for the garden. Whether you use pine needles in compost or as a mulch around your plants, they provide essential nutrients and improve the soil’s ability to hold moisture. Once you know how to compost pine needles, you don’t have to worry about any adverse effects. Are Pine Needles Bad for Compost? Many people avoid using pine needles in compost because they think it will…

postheadericon Composting corn cobs and husks – learn how to compost corn plants

Composting corn cobs and husks – learn how to compost corn plants

Image by DGLowrie By Victoria Blackstone Composting corn cobs and husks is a sustainable process of turning garbage-bound kitchen leftovers into garden-rich nutrients for your plants. You can also use other discarded parts of the corn plant in your compost pile, such as the stalks, leaves and even the corn silks. Read on for tips on composting these items successfully. Composting Corn Husks The husks – these form the outer layer that protects the developing corn – are discarded when you peel them away to expose the corn kernels. Instead…

postheadericon What is activated charcoal: can charcoal be composted for odor control

What is activated charcoal: can charcoal be composted for odor control

Image by -lvinst- By Mary H. Dyer, Master Naturalist and Master Gardener What is activated charcoal? Used in many commercial, industrial and household applications, activated charcoal is charcoal that has been treated with oxygen, which creates a fine, porous material. The millions of tiny pores work like a sponge that can absorb certain toxins. Using activated charcoal in compost and garden soil is an effective way to neutralize certain chemicals, as the substance can absorb up to 200 times its own weight. It may also help staunch unpleasant aromas, including…